State Board of Education Approves Eagle Collegiate Academy Charter School

ECA LogoThe State Board of Education during its July 8, 2020 meeting approved the establishment of Eagle Collegiate Academy Charter School.

Eagle Collegiate Academy’s “ECA” founding team is very excited that ECA will answer the need of children and their families in the communities of Santa Clarita Valley, Antelope Valley, San Fernando Valley and surrounding areas for a public college and career preparatory International Baccalaureate (IB) World school that approaches teaching and learning holistically from the Primary Years Program (PYP), to the Middle Years Program (MYP) and to the Diploma Program (DP).  Our faculty and board are elated that our four-year passionate endeavor to bring the unique benefits of these programs to our community has been rewarded.  ECA’s selection of Spanish and Korean in its World Languages program is especially well aligned to the interests and desires of our community.  Eagle Collegiate Academy will open with Pre-K to 3rd grade in the Fall of 2021.

Eagle Collegiate Academy will empower students to become self-confident, egalitarian and authentic global citizens prepared for 21st century careers and responsibilities.  ECA encourages each student to develop talents and interests as an independent-minded person among a diverse body of students, parents and faculty who together embark on a continuous lifelong learning process.  Students will participate in a rigorous, college preparatory program that is characterized by low student-teacher ratios, an extended day for academic enrichment, frequent assessments to monitor student progress, and a series of intensive interventions that are focused on quickly accelerating the learning of scholars who are performing far below grade level.  ECA will use data-driven differentiated personalized instruction and innovative curriculum to ensure that students experience the discipline and excitement of academics, the pride of developing personal character and integrity, the creative opportunities provided by the arts and extracurricular activities, the rigor and pleasure of athletics, and an awareness of, respect for and involvement with the community in which they live which allows them to graduate college and career ready with a deep understanding of the relationships among disciplines.

For Further information on ECA founding team, board members, philosophy and programs, please contact Dr. Ogo Okoye-Johnson, founder and CEO and/or at: www.eaglecollegiateacademy.org; https://twitter.com/EagleCollegiate; https://www.facebook.com/eaglecollegiateacademy/; https://www.instagram.com/eaglecollegiate/

About California Public Charter Schools: a public charter school is a publicly funded, public school open to any student in the state of California. California’s legislature approved provision for the creation of public charter schools in order to accelerate and increase the drive for competition, excellence, and continuous improvement in the state’s free, public educational system.

California’s $53 Million Lawsuit Settlement to Improve Reading

Children of the Promise Prep Academy

Children of Promise Preparatory Academy, a charter school in the Inglewood Unified School District is one of the schools that filed the lawsuit.

On Thursday February 20, 2020, in the Los Angeles Superior Court, 75 elementary public traditional and charter schools won a $53 million lawsuit settlement against the State of California for violating the students’ civil rights. The Ella T. vs. the State of California, lawsuit filed by students and their teachers two years ago claimed that the state denied the students their constitutional right to an equal access to a quality education because the students did not meet state standards in reading.

The lawsuit was filed by Public Counsel, a pro bono public interest law firm and the law firm of Morrison & Foerster. “We shouldn’t have to be filing lawsuits to establish a right to read. Achieving literacy for all children is one of the single most urgent issues in California, “This settlement is a milestone in that struggle,” said attorney Mark Rosenbaum from the Public Counsel law firm.

Read more here and here!

 

 

Lawmakers Demand Accountability for Funds Earmarked for Disadvantaged Students

CA Capitol

On January 6, 2020, Assemblywomen Shirley Weber of San Diego and Sharon Quirk-Silva of Fullerton introduced Assembly Bills 1834 and 1835 as a result of the California State Audit that revealed that the funds earmarked for disadvantaged students for the purpose of closing the achievement gap under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) are not being used for these students as intended. Both bills will correct two deficiencies of the LCFF recommended by the audit.

Assembly Bill 1834 “would require the State Department of Education to develop, on or before January 1, 2021, a tracking mechanism for school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to use to report the types of services on which they spend their supplemental and concentration grant funds. The bill would require each local educational agency, commencing July 1, 2021, to annually report to the department the types of services on which it spends its supplemental and concentration grant funds using the tracking mechanism developed by the department.”

Assembly Bill 1835 “would require each school district, county office of education, and charter school to identify unspent supplemental and concentration grant funds by annually reconciling and reporting to the department its estimated and actual spending of those moneys. The bill would require unspent funds identified pursuant to these provisions to continue to be required to be expended to increase and improve services for unduplicated pupils, and would require each local educational agency to report the amounts of unspent funds identified in its local control and accountability plan.”

Read more here.

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